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From world-class fine dining to traditional yum cha to quirky character cafes, dining will be one of the most memorable parts of your trip to Hong Kong. These are must-eat-to-be-believed meals.

Yum cha

Drinking tea is an ancient part of traditional Chinese culture. Take drinking tea and add your choice of (seemingly) never-ending fried and steamed bites, or dim sum, for brunch and you have yum cha. It’s one of the unmissable meals in Hong Kong. For an all-out experience, head to Lung King Heer, the first Chinese restaurant to be awarded three Michelin stars, located in the Four Seasons. Or for a more casual experience, try Tim Ho Wan, often referred to as ‘the cheapest Michelin restaurant.’ Menus are available in English upon request.

Lin Heung Tea House 1

Character dining

This one is for the kids and the kids at heart! Think Disneyworld without the queues. Immerse yourself into the world of a character and live carefree. At Hello Kitty Secret Garden in Tai Hang, figurines adorn the walls and your coffee and patisserie will be decorated with a cute Hello Kitty smile. Another side to character dining is the 'cutesy' designs applied to - or completely shaping - food. This is particularly common among desserts and is bound to please diners of any age.

Ice Cream Sandwich

Street Food

Food trucks are as popular as ever, bringing delicious street food to the masses. Each tends to have a specialty and they are usually found in tourist hotspots like Golden Bauhinia Square in Wan Chai, the Central Harbourfront Event Space and Ocean Park. But another side to Hong Kong’s street food scene is the seafood streets, where you will find bunches of seafood restaurants together. They are often situated near fish markets and will have water tanks where you can choose your meal. Two of the most common ones are Lei Yue Mun in Kowloon and Sai Kung Seafood Street. 

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Hong Kong-style diners

Hong Kong-style diners are called cha chaan teng and they frequently stay open until the wee hours of the morning. These establishments are a reflection of China’s history, specifically illustrating the Westernisation of Hong Kong after WWII. Menus are often in English, making them easy to experience for the Aussie traveller. On your must try list should be Hong Kong style milk tea and a pineapple bun.

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Fine dining

Diners who enjoy world-class meals can choose from the 136 Michelin star restaurants in Hong Kong, including 73 Bib Gourmand awardees. A handful of these options are located in hotels, such as the Mandarin Bar & Grill and Man Wah at the Mandarin Oriental, Tosca at the Ritz Carlton, Guo Fu Lou at the Empire Hotel and more.

Duddells Seafood Dumpling Trio2

Food trucks are as popular as ever, bringing delicious street food to the masses. Each tends to have a specialty and they are usually found in tourist hotspots like Golden Bauhinia Square in Wan Chai, the Central Harbourfront Event Space and Ocean Park. But another side to Hong Kong’s street food scene is the seafood streets, where you will find bunches of seafood restaurants together. They are often situated near fish markets and will have water tanks where you can choose your